On The Spot Blogs

How does George affect his parents' after-tax income?

Meaning the baby, not the Chancellor!

If his father's only income was his RAF's officer income, with a salary under £50k, and with a non-earning mother, they would receive the full child benefit of £20.30 per week, or £1,055.60 per year until as late as 31 August 2033 if he is in qualifying education or in the armed forces by then.

If his father receives a pay rise in the next 16 to 20 years, taking his income over £50k, child benefit is reduced or if it reaches £60k, becomes £NIL. This assumes the thresholds aren't increased with wage inflation which is probably the intention.

 

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Why it might pay to furnish your buy-to-let property

When you spend money on your buy-to-let property, you expect to get a tax deduction against the rents received to help keep your tax bill down.

For those with children, this is even more important if your rented property might take you into the 'no-go' £50,000 - £60,000 income level where child benefit might be reduced or taken away completely.

With residential properties, costs like agent's fees and gas certificates are easily deductible. But what about the costs of white goods and furniture?

 

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A Guest At The Olympics? Here Are 6 Different Tax Treatments!

If you are lucky enough to be a guest at the Olympics, what sort are you and what tax is due?

1. Your client has invited you and your better half to enjoy the men's 100m final, plus you are wined and dined, all paid for by your client. Your company pays your train fare. You are hardly going to drive after all that free booze!

This is the E word - Entertaining! But it's mainly paid for by your client so it's his problem. What is that? Well, he can't claim any VAT deduction or any corporation tax relief for the cost. Happily you don't any suffer income tax. However, you won't be able to claim corporation tax relief for the train fare as the reason for the trip was Entertaining.

 

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Spend your capital gain and pay no tax - only 170 days to go!

This is a one off tax relief within the new SEIS introduced in March's Budget.

If you have recently exchanged, or expect to before the end of the tax year, eg on a buy-to-let property, and don't welcome the 28% capital gains tax bill, you could take the view that a government subsidy to encourage you to invest your gain in a new company will help you take a risk.

For example, if you sell an asset for £250,000 and make a gain of £50,000, the capital gains tax due @ 28% is £14,000.

 

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