On The Spot Blogs

#Tax Myth 12 - Tax is only due on money received

Now or later....For example, you're probably aware that when an invoice is raised it's usual to include it in Turnover. If the invoice is not paid by your year end, it will increase your Profits for tax purposes. Hopefully by the time the tax is due, normally 9 or 10 months after the year end, you've been paid so you're not losing out on cash flow.

However, you may not be aware that if as a shareholder in your SME company you rearrange your shareholdings by giving away shares to family non-spouse members or employees, tax can be due on you.

That doesn't make sense!

 

Continue reading
  0 Comments

Become A Limited Company - Should You, Shouldn't You? Top 5 Questions To Answer

Here are the main questions we ask our clients before making a recommendation:

1. ARE YOU MAKING TAX LOSSES?

Yes - If you are a Sole Trader in your first 4 tax years of trading you can offset these losses against other taxable income from the previous 3 tax years.

 

Continue reading
  0 Comments

Sole Traders - Six #Tax Numbers You Must Know

1. 4 Years - If you are in the first 4 years of your business and make a loss, you can use this loss to reduce your tax bill in the previous 3 years, such as from the job you had before you set up your business. You will receive a tax refund.

2. £5,725 - If your profits are lower than £5,725, you don't have to pay the annual £140 Class 2 NI, unless you need a credit towards your state pension. Ask for a repayment for earlier years.

3. £7,755 - If your profits are higher than £7,755, you will pay 9% Class 4 NI. This gets you no state benefits and effectively increases your tax rate from the 20% income tax rate to a total 29% tax rate.

 

Continue reading
  0 Comments

How does George affect his parents' after-tax income?

Meaning the baby, not the Chancellor!

If his father's only income was his RAF's officer income, with a salary under £50k, and with a non-earning mother, they would receive the full child benefit of £20.30 per week, or £1,055.60 per year until as late as 31 August 2033 if he is in qualifying education or in the armed forces by then.

If his father receives a pay rise in the next 16 to 20 years, taking his income over £50k, child benefit is reduced or if it reaches £60k, becomes £NIL. This assumes the thresholds aren't increased with wage inflation which is probably the intention.

 

Continue reading
  0 Comments